Dreams Cost Nothing

Implementation Gets Expensive

 
 
 

Hi, my name is Bob Livingston and welcome to my website.


I am currently a vice-president with CIBC Private Investment Counsel in Toronto, managing portfolios for individual investors. I have spent over 40 years on Bay Street, on both the sell-side and buy-side. In the last 15 years I have made numerous presentations on wealth management and I have spoken at several conferences on the role philanthropy can play in managing your wealth.


In addition to my financial management expertise, I have become very interested in personal development. I have made numerous presentations to high school and university students, stressing the importance of wealth management and personal development.


I have written numerous essays on family issues, personal development, philanthropy, and wealth management. Two common themes in my essays are the importance of developing financial responsibility in your life as well as increasing personal involvement in your community. These goals can be realized by learning the basics of wealth management and making personal development an integral part of your operating DNA. I use numerous family anecdotes to illustrate my personal journey in pursuit of these two goals.


When I am asked why I have such a passion for personal development, my answer is simple: “It is my way of giving back to the community, it expands my comfort zone, and most importantly, I am having fun doing it.” I have come to realize one of true passions in life is helping others achieve their dreams.


You can access my reflections on family issues, personal development, philanthropy, and wealth management through the links provided. There is also resource material available regarding specific topics like organizing your financial documents and starting a personal development library.


We must never forget: “Dreams cost nothing. Implementation gets expensive.”



 


The above picture was taken three kilometers north of Dundalk (about 125 kilometers north-west of Toronto) on March 4th, 1904. A huge snowstorm caused the train to be snowed in for eleven days. The crew burnt wood in the engines for the entire time to keep warm and to melt snow for water to drink. Conductor Joe Walker (the one with the bow tie) was my great grandfather.